Schapelle Corby - Image, www.usp.com.au

Schapelle Corby – Image, www.usp.com.au

Schapelle Corby is innocent. Ms Corby has been let down by the Indonesian legal system, by the Australian Government, by the Australian Federal Police and by Australia’s Customs Service. During the last few years it became my personal witness how broken justice is in this nation when I came across Indonesian children in Australian adult jails. In campaigning for the freedom of these children I went to every agency in Australia and ultimately to the Prime Minister. No-one wanted to know, and everyone was prepared to pass the buck.

I confronted Prime Minister Julia Gillard about the fact that there were Indonesian children in our adult prisons. She froze – in silence, maintaining that attrition.

Gillard criticised for wrist x-rays – read here:

People should never be considered as expendable. Only those who have something to hide run from the truth.

Ms Corby has been treated by the Australian Government as if she is expendable, just as were the Indonesian children I came across, many of whom we have since freed.

It is time the Australian Government began in sincerity its duty to Schapelle Corby – in that they commit to her release from prison, even if it means owning up to their own horrid mistakes, to shameful conduct, to various complicity, to the fact that the 4.1 kilos of marijuana were probably planted in Ms Corby’s luggage by corrupted individuals – within transit – within Customs. In recent times, Australian Customs officers have been exposed as the middlepersons in drugs trafficking.

Earlier this year, I went on air and exposed the conversations I know from various sources at both ends – Indonesian and Australian – in that Australia’s Foreign Affairs department was trying to engineer a deal with Indonesia that the Indonesian minors languishing in our adult prisons could be released if Ms Corby is released. Tit for tat, but tit-for-tat is a dangerous game. I know that there are Government officials who believe without reservation that Ms Corby is innocent. In believing this they have a duty to do more than the next to nothing they have embarrassed themselves with so far having smashed their moral compass. They should stand up in the best interests of an Australian citizen overseas. The Indonesian Government was working vehemently behind the scenes in advocating for the release of their children from Australia’s adult prisons. I know this because I was helping them.

Just prior to Christmas, Ms Corby’s sentence was reduced by two months as part of Indonesia’s annual remissions charter.

Indonesian Justice spokesperson, Ika Yusanti said that the remission was as a result of Ms Corby’s “good behaviour.”

In August, an Indonesian Corrections Board recommended Ms Corby for early release from Kerobokan prison, but the process has since been mired in bureaucratic ramblings.

Ms Corby’s fateful trip was on 8th October 2004. Had all the available evidence been presented in Court, Ms Corby should not have been found guilty of trafficking. But what is most shocking is that it has now been shown that the Australian Government withheld crucial evidence from the Indonesian legal system, and that the Australian Government compounded this by misleading Parliament and the media which has also failed to support the natural and other rights of Ms Corby.

Ms Corby’s luggage was checked in underweight but was later recorded as nearly 5kg overweight and the boogie board was the only item not scanned at Sydney airport.

In the days and weeks ahead I will bring you a suite of articles on our Government’s failure to fairly and rightly support Ms Corby, and that inactions and omissions in the public release of information led to Ms Corby’s predicament. I will also cast aspersion upon other Australian agencies and hopefully they will respond to these instead of threats and banal statements. I will bring to you more on what did happen – what the majority of Australians do not know.

Read this 84 page report – The Transit Report – to understand more:

The Wheeler Report – 2005 – an independent review of airport security found that Australia’s airports, including Sydney, were “seriously flawed”, lacking in a number of systemic controls. The report found an array of crimes occurring within airports including the movement of cannabis.

The ABC’s 7:30 Report earlier this year, including my own whistleblowing on the fact that Australia discussed a people swap deal – Schapelle Corby for the Indonesian minors.

On ABC 24 discussing Australia’s incarceration of Indonesian children in adult prisons.

On ABC 24 discussing Australia’s incarceration of Indonesian children in adult prisons.

The story of Ms Corby threatens to draw attention to myriad layers of corruption – corruption of process, Government corruption, corruption within our airports and within Customs. A Royal Commission should be held into the Australian Government’s conduct in all matters relating to Schapelle Corby.