Abu Ghraib prison was a front for making public orchestrated American anger – it was a front to justify the so-called war on terror, an alias for securing a stronger middle Asia foothold in the bloody war for oil and gas – the energy wars have long begun. There will come the day when the scarcity wars will include food and water. The wars on Afghanistan and Iraq were set ups, we all know this now but at the time the shadowy figures working Governments over came up with the media blitz of Abu Ghraib, Guantanamo to validate the invasions and to distract global citizenry. They gamed Abu Ghraib into public consciousness by ‘whistleblowing’. Not all whistleblowers can be sure that what they are leaking has not been intended for them by those they are whistleblowing about.

We are up against corruption and the clandestine. For every act of corruption exposed in part, thousands of acts of corruption pile. For every pin prickle clandestine act discovered, thousands more will never be known. For every assumption we make that we have discovered the truth about the extent of surveillance and data and metadata interceptions rest assured that it is a million times worse. There is nothing that cannot be intercepted or altered.

Digital rights are a lie – unless they are possible, which they are not, then they do not exist. The talk about digital rights distracts, as did Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, from the truth.

 ‘Shock and Awe’ Baghdad

‘Shock and Awe’ Baghdad

Radioactive Show 23.03.2013 with Donna Mulhearn and Gerry Georgatos

Iraq war: 10 years on. Featuring; Dr. Jenny Grounds (MAPW), Donna Mulhearn, activist and journalist, recently returned from Iraq, Gerry Georgatos, Convenor of the Human Rights Alliance, and coordinator with the Wheelchairs for Kids Program, as well as interviews with Iraqi Doctors and Academics collected by David Bradbury and Donna Mulhearn. We focus on the horrifying effects of depleted uranium and other weapons, and life on the ground in Iraq, 10 years on. Listen here…..

 

NSA’s secret toolbox not so secret – the spy gadgets they don’t mind us knowing about

By The Stringer

January 11th, 2014

The NSA, and other like shadowy organisations, have monolithic research divisions into surveillance tools of which the majority of these tools we may not know about for decades to come, and only when some of their tools become obsolete, superseded by other tools we only learn about well after the event. Sources have let us know that much of what we do know about these research divisions and their innovation is what they are prepared to let us know, so as to lower our expectations of what they may have or not have.

These shadowy organisations would like us to think that it is possible to defend ourselves with encryption, when indeed any encryption can be decrypted – decoded.

“As long as the public does not understand the extent of the innovation of organisations such as the NSA, they will be less likely to question what we are doing, and less likely to contemplate the public portrayal of any scenario by us or by our Government, or by our (mainstream news) media,” said my source.

In a recent article – No encryption sound, backdoors and wormholes, full blown surveillance on its way – we discuss what is the truer extent of the research divisions of now near monoliths such as the NSA. Read here:

SPIEGEL ONLINE Interactive Graphic: The NSA’s Spy Catalog Editor’s note: This is a sidebar to our main feature story on the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations unit. You can read the main text here . ANZEIGE

SPIEGEL ONLINE
Interactive Graphic: The NSA’s Spy Catalog
Editor’s note: This is a sidebar to our main feature story on the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations unit. You can read the main text here .
ANZEIGE

In another article – Internet researchers crack RSA 4096-bit encryption – we described how little time and with how few resources it took for four Tel Aviv University researchers to break a presumed difficult encryption code. How long do you think it would take for instance the highly resourced NSA? Read here:

On December 30, Spiegel Online International published the following article by Jacob Appelbaum, Judith Horchert, Ole Reissmann, Marcel Rosenbach, Jorg Schindler, Christian Stocker and Andy Muller-Maguhn.

The NSA has a secret unit that produces special equipment ranging from spyware for computers and cell phones to listening posts and USB sticks that work as bugging devices. Here are some excerpts from the intelligence agency’s own catalog.

Editor’s note: This is a sidebar to our main feature story on the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations unit. You can read the main text here .

ANZEIGE

When agents with the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations (TAO) division want to infiltrate a network or a computer, they turn to their technical experts. This particular unit of the United States intelligence service is known internally as ANT. The acronym presumably stands for Advanced Network Technology, because that’s what the division produces — tools for penetrating network equipment and monitoring mobile phones and computers. ANT’s products help TAO agents infiltrate networks and divert or even modify data wherever the NSA’s usual methods won’t suffice. You can read more about the TAO division, its strengths and tricks in a SPIEGEL feature that was published in English on Sunday.

SPIEGEL has obtained an internal NSA catalog describing ANT’s various products, along with their prices. A rigged monitor cable, for example, which allows “TAO personnel to see what is displayed on the targeted monitor,” goes for $30 (€22). An “active GSM base station” that makes it possible to mimic the cell phone tower of a target network and thus monitor mobile phones, is available for $40,000. Computer bugging devices disguised as normal USB plugs, capable of sending and receiving data undetected via radio link, are available in packs of 50, for over $1 million.

Intelligence agencies, incidentally, are not the only ones using these types of devices. The same kind of modified USB plug played a role, for example, in a recent high-tech drug-smuggling case uncovered at the port of Antwerp, Belgium.

Spying on Allies

It has become clear that the ANT arsenal isn’t used exclusively to track suspected terrorists. GSM base stations, for example, make it possible to monitor mobile phones, such as that of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Radar systems such as the one known as “DROPMIRE” have also been used to spy on allies, for example EU representatives in Washington. And the hardware “implants” found in the ANT catalog evidently have been used, for example, to tap encrypted faxes.

NSA malware has also been used against international telecommunications companies, such as partially state-owned Belgian company Belgacom and mobile phone billing service provider MACH. One internal NSA document dating from 2004 describes a spyware program called “VALIDATOR” by saying that it provides “unique backdoor access to personal computers of targets of national interest, including but not limited to terrorist targets.”

In the graphic in this article, you can browse nearly 50 pages from the ANT catalog, sorted by where these devices would potentially be used and purged of the names and email addresses of agents. There are “implants,” as the NSA calls them, for computers, servers, routers and hardware firewalls. There is special equipment for covertly viewing everything displayed on a targeted individual’s monitor. And there are bugging devices that can conduct surveillance without sending out any measurable radio signal — their signals are instead picked up using radar waves. Many of these items are designed for subverting the technical infrastructure of telecommunications companies to exploit them, undetected, for the NSA’s purposes, or for tapping into company networks.

Spyware for mobile phones was even on offer in the 2008 version of the catalog. A Trojan for gaining total access to iPhones, which were still new at the time, was still in development, though its specifications are listed in the catalog.

‘Implants’ for Cisco, Juniper, Dell, Huawei and HP

The catalog is not up to date. Many of the software solutions on offer date from 2008, some apply to server systems or mobile phone models no longer on the market, and it is very likely that the portions SPIEGEL has seen are far from complete. And yet this version still provides considerable insight both into the tools the NSA has had at its disposal for years and into the agency’s boundless ambitions. It is safe to assume that ANT’s hackers are constantly improving their arsenal. Indeed, the catalog makes frequent mention of other systems that will be “pursued for a future release.”

The NSA has also targeted products made by well-known American manufacturers and found ways to break into professional-grade routers and hardware firewalls, such as those used by Internet and mobile phone operators. ANT offers malware and hardware for use on computers made by Cisco, Dell, Juniper, Hewlett-Packard and Chinese company Huawei.

There is no information in the documents seen by SPIEGEL to suggest that the companies whose products are mentioned in the catalog provided any support to the NSA or even had any knowledge of the intelligence solutions. “Cisco does not work with any government to modify our equipment, nor to implement any so-called security ‘back doors’ in our products,” the company said in a statement. The company has also since commented on SPIEGEL’s intitial reporting on a Cisco blog. “We are deeply concerned with anything that may impact the integrity of our products or our customers’ networks and continue to seek additional information,” the company wrote.

A representative of Hewlett-Packard wrote that the company was not aware of any of the information presented in the report and that it did “not believe any of it to be true.” Contacted by SPIEGEL reporters, officials at Juniper Networks and Huawei also said they had no knowledge of any such modifications. Meanwhile, Dell officials said the company “respects and complies with the laws of all countries in which it operates.”

TAO’s implants, in place around the world, have played a significant role in the NSA’s ability to establish a global covert network consisting partly of the agency’s own hardware, but also of other computers subverted to serve its purposes.

Intercepting Packages and Manipulating Computers

ANT’s developers often seek to place their malicious code in BIOS, software located directly on a computer’s motherboard that is the first thing to load when the computer is turned on. Even if the hard drive is wiped and a new operating system installed, ANT’s malware continues to function, making it possible to later add other spyware back onto the computer.

Along with the BIOS software of computers and servers, the NSA’s hackers also attack firmware on computer hard drives, essentially the software that makes the hardware work. The ANT catalog includes, for example, spyware capable of embedding itself unnoticed into hard drives manufactured by Western Digital, Seagate and Samsung. The first two of these are American companies.

Many of these digital tools are “remotely installable,” meaning they can be put in place over the Internet. Others, however, require direct intervention, known in NSA jargon as “interdiction.” This means that brand new products being delivered by mail are secretly intercepted, and hardware or software implants installed on them. The package is forwarded to its intended destination only after this has been done.

SPIEGEL ONLINE A typical Windows crash report prompt.

SPIEGEL ONLINE
A typical Windows crash report prompt.

Windows Error Messages Potential Sources of Information

One example of the creativity with which the TAO spies approach their work can be seen in a hacking method that exploits frequent errors on Microsoft Windows. Every user of the operating system is familiar with the window that pops up on screen when an internal problem is detected, asking the user to report the error to Microsoft with a click of the mouse. The window promises this communication will be “confidential and anonymous.”

For TAO specialists, these crash reports either were or continue to be a welcome source of potential information. When TAO selects a computer somewhere in the world as a target and enters its unique identifiers (an IP address, for example) into the corresponding database, intelligence agents are then automatically notified any time the operating system of that computer crashes and its user receives the prompt to report the problem to Microsoft.

SPIEGEL ONLINE NSA analysts have a laugh at the expense of Microsoft.

SPIEGEL ONLINE
NSA analysts have a laugh at the expense of Microsoft.

The automated crash reports are a “neat way” to gain “passive access” to a targeted machine, the presentation continues. Passive access means that, initially, only data the computer sends out into the Internet is captured and saved, but the computer itself is not yet manipulated. Still, even this passive access to error messages provides valuable insights into problems with a targeted person’s computer and, thus, information on security holes that might be exploitable for planting malware or spyware on the unwitting victim’s computer.

Although the method appears to have little importance in practical terms, the NSA’s agents still seem to enjoy it because it allows them to have a bit of a laugh at the expense of the Seattle-based software giant. In one internal graphic, they replaced the text of Microsoft’s original error message with one of their own reading, “This information may be intercepted by a foreign sigint system to gather detailed information and better exploit your machine.” (“Sigint” stands for “signals intelligence.”)

In response to a query from SPIEGEL, NSA officials issued a statement saying, “Tailored Access Operations is a unique national asset that is on the front lines of enabling NSA to defend the nation and its allies.” The statement added that TAO’s “work is centered on computer network exploitation in support of foreign intelligence collection.” The officials said they would not discuss specific allegations regarding TAO’s mission.

One trail also leads to Germany. According to a document dating from 2010 that lists the “Lead TAO Liaisons” domestically and abroad as well as names, email addresses and the number for their “Secure Phone,” a liaison office is located near Frankfurt — the European Security Operations Center (ESOC) at the so-called “Dagger Complex” at a US military compound in the Griesheim suburb of Darmstadt.

The NSA has a secret unit that produces special equipment ranging from spyware for computers and cell phones to listening posts and USB sticks that work as bugging devices. Here are some excerpts from the intelligence agency’s own catalog.

ANZEIGE

When agents with the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations (TAO) division want to infiltrate a network or a computer, they turn to their technical experts. This particular unit of the United States intelligence service is known internally as ANT. The acronym presumably stands for Advanced Network Technology, because that’s what the division produces — tools for penetrating network equipment and monitoring mobile phones and computers. ANT’s products help TAO agents infiltrate networks and divert or even modify data wherever the NSA’s usual methods won’t suffice. You can read more about the TAO division, its strengths and tricks in a SPIEGEL feature that was published in English on Sunday.

SPIEGEL has obtained an internal NSA catalog describing ANT’s various products, along with their prices. A rigged monitor cable, for example, which allows “TAO personnel to see what is displayed on the targeted monitor,” goes for $30 (€22). An “active GSM base station” that makes it possible to mimic the cell phone tower of a target network and thus monitor mobile phones, is available for $40,000. Computer bugging devices disguised as normal USB plugs, capable of sending and receiving data undetected via radio link, are available in packs of 50, for over $1 million.

Intelligence agencies, incidentally, are not the only ones using these types of devices. The same kind of modified USB plug played a role, for example, in a recent high-tech drug-smuggling case uncovered at the port of Antwerp, Belgium.

Spying on Allies

It has become clear that the ANT arsenal isn’t used exclusively to track suspected terrorists. GSM base stations, for example, make it possible to monitor mobile phones, such as that of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Radar systems such as the one known as “DROPMIRE” have also been used to spy on allies, for example EU representatives in Washington. And the hardware “implants” found in the ANT catalog evidently have been used, for example, to tap encrypted faxes.

NSA malware has also been used against international telecommunications companies, such as partially state-owned Belgian company Belgacom and mobile phone billing service provider MACH. One internal NSA document dating from 2004 describes a spyware program called “VALIDATOR” by saying that it provides “unique backdoor access to personal computers of targets of national interest, including but not limited to terrorist targets.”

In the graphic in this article, you can browse nearly 50 pages from the ANT catalog, sorted by where these devices would potentially be used and purged of the names and email addresses of agents. There are “implants,” as the NSA calls them, for computers, servers, routers and hardware firewalls. There is special equipment for covertly viewing everything displayed on a targeted individual’s monitor. And there are bugging devices that can conduct surveillance without sending out any measurable radio signal — their signals are instead picked up using radar waves. Many of these items are designed for subverting the technical infrastructure of telecommunications companies to exploit them, undetected, for the NSA’s purposes, or for tapping into company networks.

Spyware for mobile phones was even on offer in the 2008 version of the catalog. A Trojan for gaining total access to iPhones, which were still new at the time, was still in development, though its specifications are listed in the catalog.

‘Implants’ for Cisco, Juniper, Dell, Huawei and HP

The catalog is not up to date. Many of the software solutions on offer date from 2008, some apply to server systems or mobile phone models no longer on the market, and it is very likely that the portions SPIEGEL has seen are far from complete. And yet this version still provides considerable insight both into the tools the NSA has had at its disposal for years and into the agency’s boundless ambitions. It is safe to assume that ANT’s hackers are constantly improving their arsenal. Indeed, the catalog makes frequent mention of other systems that will be “pursued for a future release.”

The NSA has also targeted products made by well-known American manufacturers and found ways to break into professional-grade routers and hardware firewalls, such as those used by Internet and mobile phone operators. ANT offers malware and hardware for use on computers made by Cisco, Dell, Juniper, Hewlett-Packard and Chinese company Huawei.

There is no information in the documents seen by SPIEGEL to suggest that the companies whose products are mentioned in the catalog provided any support to the NSA or even had any knowledge of the intelligence solutions. “Cisco does not work with any government to modify our equipment, nor to implement any so-called security ‘back doors’ in our products,” the company said in a statement. The company has also since commented on SPIEGEL’s intitial reporting on a Cisco blog. “We are deeply concerned with anything that may impact the integrity of our products or our customers’ networks and continue to seek additional information,” the company wrote.

A representative of Hewlett-Packard wrote that the company was not aware of any of the information presented in the report and that it did “not believe any of it to be true.” Contacted by SPIEGEL reporters, officials at Juniper Networks and Huawei also said they had no knowledge of any such modifications. Meanwhile, Dell officials said the company “respects and complies with the laws of all countries in which it operates.”

TAO’s implants, in place around the world, have played a significant role in the NSA’s ability to establish a global covert network consisting partly of the agency’s own hardware, but also of other computers subverted to serve its purposes.

 

Edward Snowden’s revelations and message only a raindrop – the flicker of hope can burn brightly

by Gerry Georgatos

December 26th, 2013

Edward Snowden’s 2013 Christmas message, and his leaks, have been in the name of human worth and dignity which are of course underwritten by the right to privacy – by the right to oneself. Each human being should be able to determine themselves who they are and want to be, and this should not be guided or meddled with by the State or by any objectives of the State. In our current socio-political climates, we have States that want to determine every aspect of the human being, as if a product, capital. These are not the States that we read about everyday in our various news formats which are filtered with statements of human worth and human dignity but the States that hide out of sight – shadow states, governments within governments, transnational corporations that run not only their own show but the whole show.

Edward Snowden’s Christmas message is profound but too late – arguing that it is time that humanity reigns in the shadow states. Unfortunately, Edward Snowden’s revelations are at best only the tip of the largest imaginable iceberg – just a raindrop.

In his Christmas message, Edward Snowden nobly warned of the loss of privacy – but the horse has bolted – privacy has long been lost. The research and innovation, of course clandestine, that is going on within the shadowy but monolithic giants of surveillance, such as the NSA, the CIA, are according to a source that far ahead of anything established as fact in the public domain that hence the race to protect privacy has already been lost. There is no privacy.

Spooks have always done whatever they have done – spying, surveillance, manipulation, murder – in the name of their own agendas – they have more often than not done all this ex-judicially. The ability to spy on others from orbital satellites, or via the permeable membranes of the internet, or through one’s DNA, or through the radiation a human body gives off, is the manna spooks had once imagined and now have. Their job has never been easier.

Edward Snowden’s message is noble and his actions heroic as were Chelsea Manning’s but there are high concentrations of research and innovation within the organisations they worked for or were contracted to that have been kept In the strictest confidence. We only know of some of what goes on, thanks to WikiLeaks, thanks to Chelsea Manning, thanks to Edward Snowden, thanks to many others, but only from the low concentrations of data collection and surveillance. There’s more, but these reservoirs of what actually are going on are protected with never-before-known-fervour.

Flea-sized drones and internet based interceptions are just a taste of what is to come – humanity is at a crossroad which will determine its fate, that is all of humanity, not just some of humanity. We are reaching deep into the human being, into every inner recess. I will write more in a near future article.

Edward Snowden urged for the end to mass surveillance in his Christmas message but for this to have any hope of occurring, organisations such as the NSA and the CIA would have to cease altogether.

In a two-minute video recording from Moscow, Edward Snowden referred to the loss of privacy for human beings similar to that posed in George Orwell’s ‘1984’.

“Great Britain’s George Orwell warned us of the danger of this kind of information. The types of collection in the book – microphones and video cameras, TVs that watch us are nothing compared to what we have available today, “ said Edward Snowden via his message broadcast on Britain’s Channel 4.

“We have sensors in our pockets that track us everywhere we go. Think about what this means for the privacy of the average person.”

“A child born today will grow up with no conception of privacy at all.”

“They will never know what it means to have a private moment to themselves, an unrecorded, unanalysed thought. And that is the problem because privacy matters, privacy is what allows us to determine who we are and who we want to be.”

In a recent interview in The Washington Post, Edward Snowden said, “Together we can find a better balance, end mass surveillance and remind the government that if it really wants to know how we feel, asking is always cheaper than spying.”

We need to unveil what capacities for surveillance, monitoring and control of people that agencies such as the NSA and the CIA now have, and what their research agendas are before we can even contemplate seriously changing anything. It will take some even more serious leaking to let us in on what is going on.

Read here about encryption and backdoors – that there is no encryption that cannot be decrypted and that backdoors are everywhere.

Read here about internet researchers, not those within the heavily resourced clandestine surveillance shadow states, who have decrypted what others had thought could not be decrypted.

The ability to discover the truth is outstripped by the capacity to manifest deceit. This is the game feverishly played by what are effectively the ex-judicial agencies of the NSA, CIA, etc. Their greatest threat was WikiLeaks, and still is, which coalesced as an entity of truth finders, investigative journalists and whistleblowers. If there is to be any hope of privacy and humanity as we should know it in the digital age then it can only be if that flicker of hope that is WikiLeaks is not extinguished, and if that flicker grows, burns brightly, many others will join in. Without cultural shifts there is no hope.

Edward Snowden’s 2013 Christmas Message – here:

 

Internet researchers crack RSA 4096-bit encryption

by Gerry Georgatos

December 25th, 2013

As clandestine research and innovation into surveillance, hacking, sliding in backdoors and into what will soon be coined widely, internet wormholes, outpaces all imaginable propositions at this time in the public domain, internet security researchers are forlornly trying to catch up. In the last week, internet researchers have successfully cracked one of the most long held secure encryption algorithms, the 4096-bit RSA. That is, it has never been cracked before in the public domain – outside of the monolithic research industries of agencies such as the NSA, despite their protestations and leaked stories for deals such as $10 million payments between the NSA and RSA to ensure backdoors – but this camouflaged what they are actually capable of.

Researchers, Daniel Genkin, one of the inventors of RSA, Eran Tromer and Adi Shamir cracked the 4096-bit by using a simple microphone to listen into CPU sounds – and through this decrypting data.

What heavily funded research units in the shadow states of mass surveillance agencies which liaise with the American Government have at hand in terms of being able to decrypt data pales anything that Mr Genkin, Mr Tromer and Mr Shamir could get their hands on.

The researchers carried out their acoustic cryptanalysis by a side channel attack. Side channels are imprimaturs unintentionally, or by inbuilt flaws, left where they can be reproduced – for instance in the researchers’ case by listening to high pitched sounds – 10khz to 150 khz – from the computer.

The researchers found that by narrowing down a frequency corridor sounds can be filtered from the CPU’s voltage regulator – imprimaturs are carried through systems – everything is effectively semi-permeable. The language unfolds and needs only to be translated.

The researchers found the sounds to the decryption key.

But if the researchers can crack the decryption from within a paucity of resources, then the majorly well-resourced agencies – in the well-funded liberties of their shadow states – have long achieved this but it pays no dividend for their cumulative and ultimate objectives to let the public interest in on all this.

The researches had successes on a number of computer units – laptops and desktops, and note that the data they were able to identify from electrical signals can also be identified from any power socket, such as a wall socket – nothing disappears into the ether. The signals can also be picked up from the remote of an Ethernet cable. We are all wired up! Our imprimaturs are everywhere, and they can be tapped into. Another source is yourself – we are in reality radiation and electrical energy, and by touching the computer we relay the signals – more on this in my next article.

Acoustic cryptanalysis, in its catching up to that which already exists but we do not know about, has a Google Earth ability – it can zero in on anyone, anywhere. If you are decrypting files anyone nearby can hence obtain your decryption key – for instance this can be done by mobile phone located near the computer or by spear phishing.

The researchers advise that those bent on keeping their data secure should move towards the heaviest possible data encryption and to be conscious at all times of the physical security of their internet based appliances.

All this will help with internet security – the integrity of confidentiality – from the general population, but not from the well-resourced mass surveillance organisations, despite what they and others will tell you.

 

The research paper – RSA Key Extraction via Low-Bandwith Acoustic Cryptanalysis – all 56 pages in PDF can be read here.

Previous story:

Image – www.ibnlive.in.com

Image – www.ibnlive.in.com

No encryption sound – backdoors and wormholes – full-blown surveillance on its way

by Gerry Georgatos

December 24th, 2013

Before recent stories that certain software and operating systems contain backdoors that the National Surveillance Agency (NSA) could use to remotely control computers I spoke to someone who set the record straight for me. Recently, the German publication, Zeit Online has obtained documents alleging German Government software experts have identified backdoors in Windows 8 that the NSA can waltz through. Allegedly, according to the German experts, once Windows 8 is paired with the 2.0 brand of the Trusted Platform Modules (TPM), in 2015, they will not be able to deactivate Windows 8 backdoors.

The experts claim that they can instead use Windows 7 with relative safety – and maintain the presumption of various integrity of confidentiality, or so they would like to think.

It is all gaming I have been told. We are being gamed. We are being led to believe that there are encryptions which can be secure, but I have been told this is impossible. We are being told that we are entitled to privacy in the digital age, that there can be privacy, and that there is privacy. But there is no privacy in the digital age.

Hidden from even many of the experts in the field are the huge but secret research programs into digital technology, and particularly into surveillance. This research is not being merely invested in for surveillance purposes alone, but also ultimately for the purpose of control.

The biggest lie of all is that governments will do anything about online privacy. The biggest liars of all are the politicians and frauds who purport that legislation can do the trick. However their mendacity is not surprising. Whether legislation itself is perforated by its own backdoors or not, giants like the NSA, with their transnational reaches, will do as they have always done.

The digital age, from its birth and onwards, thrives on osmotic premises – the flow of information from a region of concentration to another region of concentration and through what is always a semi-permeable membrane. It does not matter how high or low the regions of concentration are, the imperative is the semi-permeable membrane.

While the gamers – and those sleepers and plants the gamers have invested in – continue to game human consciousness into making us believe in what it wants us to believe – such as the possibility of privacy in the digital age – the fact is the clandestine mass surveillance and target specific surveillance agencies will continue to do what they have been doing, and much more, despite any proposition of legislation and perceived judicial oversight. They will continue to collect data, use that data, rarely inform any public authority, including government, that they have that data, and they will also continue to improve the ways in which they invade data units and compiles, in perverting the integrity of the data and in skewing and manifesting data, in perceptually modifying the truth, in creating narratives – all in the name of gaming outcomes and objectives as so identified by what they interpret as the interests of a now near all powerful shadow state that most of humanity is oblivious too.

Recently, the United Nations General Assembly unanimously adopted a resolution aimed at protecting the right to privacy against unlawful surveillance in the digital age. However the giants of the global industry of surveillance will continue to do what they do, and naturally up the ante in monitoring humanity, for myriad reasons and objectives, and do this with the inherent blessing of their governments, powerless governments that is, and when pulled up once in a while as sporadically occurs during this period of contemporary modernity, they will argue the surveillance and data collection, including the collateral damage by privacy invasions, was lawful and justified, as if inherently underwritten by utilitarian principles.

Germany and Brazil introduced the banal resolution following the trickle of scandals of reports of US surveillance which included German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff. I suggestively write ‘trickle’, because we are nowhere near Pandora’s Box.

A source that could not be more well-placed but whom I cannot identify in any way, but who has never let me down with anything, said to me, “Everyone is monitored, everyone is tapped. This is not just about spying, it is about generating outcomes. This is about the making of foreign policy.”

“Whatever is being said about (various invasions of privacy or spying) not happening again, I can tell you it is happening right now. The technology we have, you will be shocked. The research into tomorrow’s technology will make a mockery of all those politicians suggesting that digital privacy laws can make any difference. There will never be a law big enough in any field that will downsize, downplay or control surveillance.”

“Get ready, because before everyone knows it, the daily intake from every single citizen’s movements and views are becoming the reality of what is and will be in ways never-before-known – Big Brother.”

“The research being done on human cells, on human cloning, on ageing, on reconnaissance for information past and present you would be indeed shocked. We are way ahead of even tomorrow’s science fiction.”

The UN resolution “affirms that the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online, including the right to privacy.”

However according to my source, “Privacy and surveillance – data collection – are polar opposites and in reality only one exists, not both.”

“By 2020 it will be a whole new world, with every human being – under the easy watch of numerous agencies.”

“People will not even own their thoughts.”

“We have so much research underway that by 2030 (the USA) will have total control of this world, it will be achieved by technology, every person’s every footstep, literally, will be recorded. We will know what everyone is thinking, doing…”

The 193 members of the United Nations stated in the resolution, “to respect and protect the right to privacy, including the context of digital communication.” The resolution called on all countries “to review their procedures, practices and legislation regarding the surveillance of communications, their interception and collection of personal data, including mass surveillance, interception and collection, with a view to upholding the right to privacy of all their obligations under international human rights law.”

The resolution called for UN members to effect independent effective oversight methods to ensure transparency and accountability.

“There has never been and never will be such respect for such measures, otherwise governments would never have sanctioned the agencies we have in place, nor would they have sat idly by as all these agencies have taken their own shape. These agencies will not be de-established. They will continue, virtually combatively, to innovate technology to control destinies, people do not matter.”

That sounded like anathema!

The UN resolution was watered down from the contention that the domestic and international interception and collection of communications may constitute a human rights violation. The resolution directed UN Human Rights chief Navi Pillay to report to the Human Rights Council and the General Assembly on the protection and promotion of privacy”.

Human Rights Watch internet researcher Cynthia Wong said the “resolution is a critical first step that puts mass surveillance squarely on the international agenda.”

She called for the “modernisation” of “privacy protections or we risk undermining the internet’s potential as a tool for advancing human rights.”

However my source said that this smacks of “incredible naivety”.

“The internet belongs to us, we created it, we own it, we own its vehicles, we knew three decades ago, a decade before the ‘super information highway’ what we were doing.”

“We don’t have just backdoors, we have ‘secret wormholes’, we have it all, the whole vessel to look into, any part of it, at any time, and we can intercept anything at any time, even while it is in transit and modify it, alter it, make it if we see fit.”

“There is no encryption that we cannot undo in quick time. It’s all a myth that we can be challenged or that there are protections against us. There is no code we cannot break. Everything is algorithms, forget exponentials, we can undo anything and no one is the wiser.”

“We can watch in real time, we can watch after the event, we can reconfigure anything, we can add anything we want to anyone’s computer at any time wherever they may be in the world.”

In our long discussions my source also described other disturbing information, some of it which I have long known from elsewhere, and some of it which most people know, however which may have some purpose to consider in this article.

“Some of the information that is out there, we have intentionally put out there for it to be picked up. We wanted Abu Ghraib known, because it sought to make real (bona fide) the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. We wanted the world to believe in American anger at  9/11, we wanted the world to think – what have we been brought to, torture and cruelty, murder. This is foundational stuff in foreign policy making.”

“We build profiles and news stories over long periods of time. We insert information to make a story, an event, we build events (narratives). We have journalists all over the world, we have our people in every government. It’s a practice that works. We cultivate people. You would be surprised to know that it’s a practice that political parties do to each other. Not only do they cultivate conduits in opposing parties but they plant candidates – sleepers – in the opposite party, it happens in Australia too. Some of them finish up in (parliament). This is about power, ideologue and agendas. We all game, gaming is what it is all about.”

“We do some (formal) data requests so that it appears we follow some common protocol but what’s on the record is a raindrop.”

Government data requests – 1.1.2013 to 30.6.2013:

YAHOO: 12,444

FACEBOOK: 12,000

GOOGLE: 10,918

MICROSOFT: 7,014

APPLE:2,000

SKYPE:978

TWITTER:902

Percentage of requests where the data was delivered:

YAHOO:92 per cent

FACEBOOK:79 per cent

GOOGLE: 83 per cent

MICROSOFT:76 per cent

SKYPE: 81 per cent

TWITTER: 67 per cent

“Data requests are a veneer, a raindrop, we get it all, 100 per cent of the time.”

In the wake of Edward Snowden’s leaks, the US Government is buying time – attrition – with a five member panel established by President Barack Obama. It is nothing more than about restoring ‘trust’ in the US Government after Edward Snowden’s revelations of massive global surveillance operations – which should never had been a surprise following the WikiLeaks’ cables and thirty years of various disclosures by various whistleblowers.

The five person panel established has recommended foreign leaders only be targeted for surveillance with presidential approval. The recommendations include the usual hogwash that various checks should be met when agencies are seeking to engage in surveillance of anyone including world leaders. That there is some authorising law or executive order and some degree of judicial oversight.

Some Americans were surprised by the extent of America’s spying on its own people, including the gathering of phone records and emails, but according to my source, “we’ve been through all this before, it is now that it is digital and we can access anything in real time.”

“Today’s news only, our agencies will not be diminished. We will be watching anyone at any time whenever we feel like it, from the bedroom to the bathroom.”

Public comments from one of the panel members that my highly well-placed source laughed at included counter-terrorism expert Richard Clarke’s, “We’re not saying the struggle against terrorism is over or it has declined to such an extent that we can dismantle the mechanisms we have put in place to defend the country. What we are saying is those mechanisms can be more transparent. They can have more outside oversight and judicial oversight.”

The NSA’s 32 year NSA veteran, Bill Binney was one of the architects of the NSA’s digital information mass surveillance program. Mr Binney has recently said the information gathering and archiving is confined “to a totalitarian process.” He has said to a number of forums that the USA has already become “a police State”. He has described America as having become a “turnkey totalitarian State.” The means to the end do matter – you become what you do, and what you do has a pernicious and endemic effect.